My Family and Other Families, Now and Long Ago
Unit 4 Overview:  Economics Lesson 1:  What Does Jack Want?  What Does He Need? Home Lesson 5:  Economic Scarcity and Choices Lesson 6:  What Goods and Services Does My Community Provide? Lesson 7:  The ABC's of Saving Unit 4 Glossary Lesson 4:  Working Hard For a Living Lesson 3:  A Chair for My Mother:  Why Adults Work Lesson 2:  Economic Scarcity Lesson 1:  Me and My Classroom:  The Rules We Follow Guided Reading Suggestions

Lesson 6: What Goods And Services Can My Community Provide?

Overview:

As students learn about needs and wants they will also learn to differentiate between goods and services, and learn that goods and services are provided in the community. They will identify workers that provide the goods and services that people in most communities want to have.

Suggested time allowance: 2 class period(s)

Standards:

  • SS.4.1: The study of economics requires an understanding of major economic concepts and systems, the principles of economic decision making, and the interdependence of economies and economic systems throughout the world.
  • RL1.11: Make connections between self, text, and the world.
  • RI.1.3:  Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
  • RI.1.7:  Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas
  • L.1.5: With guidance and support from adults, demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

Essential Unit Questions:

  • How do people in a community fulfill their needs and wants?

Resources/Materials for this lesson:

  • Chart paper
  • Marker (for teacher)
  • Computer
  • Digital projector
  • Vocabulary cards (included)
  • Screen
  • 9x12 white construction paper (enough for each student to have 2)
  • Markers for students (skinny and fat)
  • Colored pencils for students
  • SMART Board Activity (included)
    Students identify community helpers and discuss their important roles and responsibilities.

Books:

  • Kalman, Bobbie. Community Helpers from A to Z. New York: Crabtree Publishing Company, 1997. An alphabet book introducing occupations oriented to the community, including emergency workers, medical workers, the service industry, and business.
  • Scarry, Richard. Busy, Busy Town. Wisconsin: Golden Books, 2000. Welcome to Busytown where everyone is on their way to work. The Busytown grocers stock and sell fresh food; the bankers keep the money safe; the doctors and nurses make sure everyone is healthy; the postal workers collect and deliver letters; the sanitation workers collect trash and recyclables; the lumber workers chop trees to make furniture and houses; and the workers at the docks, railroads and airports help transport people and freight. But it takes even more careers and professions than that to keep this busy town running.
  • Scarry, Richard. Richard Scarry's What Do People Do All Day. New York, NY: Random House Books for Young Readers, 1968. Shows and tells what busy people do every day to build houses, sail ships, fly planes, keep house, and grow food.
  • Rice, Melanie. All About Things People Do. New York, NY: Kingfisher Books Doubleday, 1992. Describes what people do in different jobs, such as pilots, athletes, and hairdressers; what different places look like, from factories, to schools, to theaters; and how things are made, including cars, clay pots, and buildings.
  • Larson, Jennifer.  Economics in Action. Or Do I Need It? Or Do I Want It? Lerner Classroom:  February 1, 2010.  These books offer easy-to-read introductions to the world of economics. Addressing readers as “you,” Larson asks questions such as, “Did you ever get money for your birthday?” and “How do you decide what to do with your money?” (Do I Need It?). The everyday-life examples will demonstrate to children that they can play a vital role in the economic world. Clear, age-appropriate language explains new concepts well.
  • Andrews, Carolyn.  What are Goods and Services? Crabtree Publishing Company: September 1, 2008.  This clearly explains goods and services.

Web Connections:

  • Your Neighborhood. Ben’s Guide to US Government for Kids.
    http://bensguide.gpo.gov/k-2/neighborhood/index.html July 28, 2006.
    This web site permits students to click on a fire station, police station, post office, hospital, library or school. For each of these places, a community helper is displayed and an explanation of his or her job is offered.
  • What’s My Job? Homes and Communities US Department of Housing and Urban Development.
    http://www.hud.gov/kids/job1.html July 28, 2006.
    Interactive site. Click on a picture to answer the question.
  • Communities – What they provide for us. National Council on Educational Economics. http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/EM310/flash/em310_popupActivity.html July 28, 2006.
    Pop-up activity students can use to review the roles of community helpers
  • Goods and Services. National Council on Educational Economics. http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.php?lesson=EM642&page=teacher. February 7, 2010. Lesson plan that helps students distinguish between people who produce goods and people who provide services to a community. Click on the interactive activity for students to drag and drop the service to the worker who provides that service.
  • "Factory Work - How Things Are Produced" . PBS Kids. http://pbskids.org/rogers/R_house/picpic.htm
    Seeing the factory can help the students understand that most things happen through a process— with a beginning, a middle, and an end. (NOTE: you will need to have RealOne Player to view the online movies provided on this site. It is a free download.)
  • Woof! Woof! At Your Service. National Council on Educational Economics. http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM194
    An on-line lesson for teachers.

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Activities/Procedures:

This lesson can be introduced through literature or with a technology component.

Steps for a Literature based lesson:

Day 1

Before lesson:

1. Choose one of the books in the resources to read during the lesson.
2. Make a T-chart using chart paper labeled “Helpers in our Community.”
One column should be labeled “Community Helper,” the other “Goods or Services.”

Lesson:

1. Read the book about all the different community helpers. After reading the book, have the students turn and talk to each other about the different community workers in the book. Then the teacher and students will make a list of the helpers in the book and ones who are in YOUR community on the pre-made chart.

2. The teacher will choose 1 of the helpers and model how to draw a helper on 12x9 white construction paper.

3. Then let each child choose at least one community helper to draw on white construction paper using a pencil to sketch and either colored pencils, or skinny and fat markers to fill in. Students should write the name of the community helper (ie. Doctor) beneath the drawing. The teacher should collect them when the students are finished.

Day 2

Before lesson:

1. Post the two column chart from Day 1.
2. Have available the drawings of the helpers drawn from Day 1

Lesson:

1. Hold out your hand and place some sort of food in it, a toy in it and then something that can be worn in it. Then tell the class that all of these items have something in common. They are all grown or made. Explain that items that people can buy are called "goods" if those items were grown or made. Explain further that the word "goods" has nothing to do with being good. It is an old English word meaning merchandise or things you can buy in a store. Now tell the students that we sometimes buy things that are not grown or made. For example, we get lessons for different things we learn like swimming, piano, tennis, -- but we don't go to a store and point to a lesson and put it on! Instead, a lesson is something someone teaches us. In other words, it is a service. Or we may get our teeth cleaned at the dentist -- but we don't carry the cleaning home in a box. A teeth cleaning is another example of a service--of something that someone does for us. Similarly, when our electricity doesn’t work in our house, we don't go and buy an electric fixer; we pay a person to come to our house and fixes it for us. In this case, the service we buy is electricity and an electrician comes and fixes our electricity. Government workers provide some services. Usually the government does not provide plumbers, car washers, or barbers (although in some special cases it does), but government does provide us with many other community helpers. Tell students that some services that we need are provided by businesses (like getting our teeth cleaned), but sometimes communities need to provide services for the people that live in them. Who collects your trash? Who delivers your mail? Who protects us from crime? These are all services provided by our local communities.

2. Use the vocabulary cards (included) to discuss goods, services and community.

  • goods- things that are grown or made
  • services – a job a person does to help others
  • community – the place where people live and work together

3. Now have the children turn and talk to each other to discuss what goods or services the community helpers they made yesterday provide to people in their community. Then have them share a few, and the teacher will write the names of the helpers and the good/service in the correct column.

4. Then model how to make the good or service for the helper you made yesterday using the white construction paper.

5. Then the students will draw the goods or service that their helper provides to the community on white construction paper.

6. Create a bulletin board using the helpers and their service or goods.

Steps for a technology based lesson:

Day 1

Before lesson:

1. Bookmark Your Neighborhood. Ben’s Guide to US Government for kids. http://bensguide.gpo.gov/k-2/neighborhood/index.html and Communities – what they provide for us.

2. Bookmark National Council on Educational Economics. http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/EM310/flash/em310_popupActivity.html July 28, 2006 to use during the lesson. You will have to scroll down on the page and find the “interactive drag and drop” activity.

3. Set up the digital projector, screen and computer.

4. Make a T-chart using chart paper labeled “Helpers in our Community.”
One column should be labeled “Community Helper,” the other “Goods or Services.”

Lesson:

1. View the interactive websites and talk about different workers in the community.

2. After viewing the websites, make a list of the helpers from the site and others who were not but are in YOUR community on the pre-made chart.

3. The teacher should choose 1 of the helpers from the chart and model how to draw a helper on 12x9 white construction paper.

4. Then let each child choose at least one community helper to draw on white construction using a pencil to sketch and either colored pencils, skinny and fat markers to fill in. The teacher should collect them when they are finished.

Day 2

Before lesson:

1. Choose one of websites to use during the lesson.

2. Set up the digital projector, screen and computer

3. Look through the different websites to pick and choose the ones to begin the lesson.

4. Post the chart begun on Day 1.

5. Have available the workers made from Day 1.

Lesson:

1. Hold out your hand and place some sort of food in it, a toy in it and then something that can be worn in it. Then tell them that all of these items have something in common. They are all grown or made. Explain that items that people can buy are called "goods" if those items were grown or made. Explain further that the word "goods" has nothing to do with being good. It is an old English word meaning merchandise or things you can buy in a store. Now tell the students that we sometimes buy things that are not grown or made. For example, we get lessons for different things we learn like swimming, piano, tennis, -- but we don't go to a store and point to a lesson and put it on! Instead, a lesson is something someone does for us. In other words, it is a service. Or we may get our teeth cleaned at the dentist -- but we don't carry it home in a box. A teeth cleaning is another example of a service--of something that someone does for us. Similarly, when our electricity doesn’t work in our house, we don't go and buy an electric fixer; we pay a person to come to our house and do something for us. In this case, the service we buy is electricity: an electrician comes and fixes our electricity. Government workers provide some services. To introduce this point, click http://bensguide.gpo.gov/k-2/government/index.html. Use the information there to explain that services are provided by people who are in charge of the country, all 50 states, and all the cities in all 50 states Usually the government does not provide plumbers, car washers, or barbers (although in some special cases it does), but government does provide us with many other community helpers. Tell students that some services that we need are provided by businesses (like getting our teeth cleaned), but sometimes communities need to provide services for the people that live in them. Who collects your trash? Who delivers your mail? Who protects us from crime? These are all services provided by our local communities. To find out about the people who supply services in our communities, click on: http://bensguide.gpo.gov/k-2/neighborhood/index.html

6. Use the vocabulary cards to discuss goods, services and community

  • Goods- Things that are grown or made
  • Services – A job a person does to help others
  • Community – The place where people live and work together.

7. Now have the children turn and talk to each other to discuss what goods or services the community helpers they made yesterday provide to people. Then have them share a few as the teacher adds them in the correct column to the chart the class began on Day 1.
8. Model how to make the good or service for the helper you made yesterday using white construction paper.
9. Have students make the goods or service that their helper provides to the community.
10. Create a bulletin board using the helpers and their service or goods.

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Evaluation/Assessment:

  • Have students review the Community Helpers providing services by trying these activities on community helpers and the goods and services they provide.
  • Have them put the title, "Community Helper" at the top of a sheet of paper. Instruct them to write the title of a service provider and draw the community helper providing a service to the community.
  • You may also have them write a sentence starting with "I am thankful for the [insert title of a community helper] because..."
  • Students can check their understanding by sorting people into categories (good, service, or both).

Vocabulary:

goods
things that are grown or made
services a job a person does to help others
community the place where people live and work together

Extension Activities:

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Integrated Social Studies/English Language Arts Curriculum (Grade 1)
©Putnam/Northern Westchester BOCES Curriculum & Instructional Services
Last revised June 23, 2012