OC21 COURSE OFFERINGS FOR THE 2016-2017 SCHOOL YEAR

An outstanding opportunity awaits you during the 2016-2017 school year. Interested students will have the opportunity to choose from eight dynamic online courses designed to expand your knowledge, interest and experience. Through a consortium of school districts, organized by PNW BOCES, students have the ability to learn alongside teachers and students from across our region. Utilizing a blended learning approach, students and staff collaborate through two face to face half-day meetings and online. Say goodbye to those heavy textbooks and learn to manage your coursework in a way that fits your busy life.

You are welcome to learn more about any or all of our outstanding course offerings by visiting the links to the below. As you review the course offerings, you will also have the opportunity to meet the teachers through video presentations. To learn how you can register for an OC21 course, please contact your school counselor at your earliest convenience.

 

ADVENTURES IN PROGRAMMING
Science Elective
Spring Semester

This course will introduce students to the basics of software engineering and programming languages. Students will work collaboratively on applying the skills they learn to design and create basic computer programs. They will explore how to annotate text using HTML, create and evaluate basic computer algorithms, and explore syntax and grammar underlying many programming languages. This introductory course will allow students to explore several visual programming languages.

Meet the teacher
Dr. Amy Fox
Valhalla
BIAS BEWARE: THE HISTORY OF MEDIA AND PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS
Social Studies Elective
Fall Semester

“The most trusted name in news.”-CNN, “Fair and balanced.”-Fox News, “All the news that’s fit to print.”-New York Times. This course will examine the use of mass media by presidential candidates throughout American history. It will start with the penny press, which was used in America’s earliest elections and continue through the use of radio, television, and the Internet. Students will analyze the impact of media in presidential campaigns and design various campaign messages using different forms of media. There will be an emphasis on the Internet and use of social media in the most recent presidential elections.

Meet the teacher
Travis Hayes
Social Studies Teacher, Lakeland High School
BRAIN GAMES: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF HOW TO FOCUS, REMEMBER, AND COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY WITH THE TEENAGE BRAIN
Social Studies Elective
Spring Semester

Why can’t I remember the answers for the exam? How can I get along better with the people in my life? How does my teenage brain work and why? This course will examine the latest research related to the adolescent brain and how to most effectively use it to remember, focus, plan, and communicate with others. Students will learn about the development of the adolescent brain compared to that of the adult brain. We will discuss how we think, plan, organize, and make judgments. Students will learn about memory through online videos, readings, and games and mnemonic devices. Students will organize and plan information for more effective long-term memory through the creation of a notebook website. Finally, we will examine the burgeoning industry of brain training through computer applications and current studies.

Meet the teacher
Travis Hayes
Social Studies Teacher, Lakeland High School
FOOD FIGHT: THE TRUTH BEHIND OUR FOOD
English/Literacy Elective
Fall Semester

Have you ever wondered where your food comes from? In this course, students will explore societal problems that are directly related to food availability, preparation, distribution, and consumption. Through a critical examination of nutrition articles, books, blogs, social media, consumer reports, and food labels, students will seek the truth behind some or our popular food choices. Students will take a stance, making a claim about how our nutritional choices are impacted, for good or bad, by the literature available to us. Students will generate possible solutions to the problems they identify and take steps to inform others about the truth behind our food.

Meet the teacher
Cara Dippolito
Eastchester
FOUNDATIONS OF ENGINEERING AND CONTEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY
Technology Elective
Fall Semester

Follow the path of a modern skyscraper from planning and design, excavation, steel and concrete assembly, and mechanical installation. This course will explore the complex systems that are employed by today’s architects, engineers, and construction managers as they build in New York City and around the world. Each week we will make “virtual” visits to the sites where project engineers will walk us through the challenges and complexities facing today’s builders. Students will attend webinars, view videos of the project as it develops, and make actual visits to a site under study, as well as engage in informed dialogue with project engineers and architects. Through a unique partnership with a major international construction corporation, students will have the opportunity to learn firsthand what it takes to build complex structures and will be eligible to apply for a summer internship in New York City.

Meet the teacher
Nick Cucchiarella
Technology Teacher, Mamaroneck High School
INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY
Social Studies Elective
Fall or Spring Semester

Anthropology has been described as an investigation into who we are now, where we came from, and how we got to be the way we are today. In this course, students will be introduced to this “holistic” social science and gain an understanding of what culture is, how it is similar and different for humans living in groups, and how it can be identified and compared. The course will develop students’ inquiry skills as they use observation, questioning, interviewing, and narrative storytelling to begin to answer the questions: What is a culture? What is/are my culture(s)? How are elements of a culture transmitted from generation to generation? What causes cultural continuity? What brings about cultural change? What story do I want to tell about my culture/cultures? Finally, students will choose how to tell the story they have researched, using one of a variety of digital storytelling techniques to share their work with the class. *College credit option available.

Meet the teacher
Anita Prentice
Social Studies Teacher, Peekskill High School
SPORTS MANAGEMENT, MEDIA AND MARKETING
Social Studies Elective
Fall Semester

Do sports management, media, and marketing have a role in your future? According to Forbes Magazine, despite tough economic times, sport-related industries are still expected to grow 3-5% a year over the next decade. How can you decide if a sports-related major is the right choice for you? What might working in a sports-related field be like? This course will help answer these questions and more. Students will learn about the action that takes place off the field or court by exploring management – What might it be like to be a general manager of a professional sports team? What are the roles and responsibilities of a college athletic director or facilities manager of a sports arena? Through an examination of sports marketing, we will learn about related products, their role in the marketplace, and how athletes and products are promoted. As we study media, we will learn about sports video, radio, and photography, and other roles that make the sports entertainment industry one of the most profitable in the world.

Meet the teachers
Scott Patrillo
Social Studies,Dobbs Ferry
SUSTAINABILITY AND SOCIETY: PLAN FOR THE PRESENT, SAVE FOR THE FUTURE
Social Studies Elective
Spring Semester

Sustainability is the ability for a resource to be used without being completely used up or destroyed. This course focuses on finding solutions to problems of sustainability in society today. We’ll use an interdisciplinary approach, blending natural and social science techniques. After a broad examination of the problems of sustainability, each student will choose one real problem as a personal focus project. Topic areas include energy, transportation, housing, urban planning, agriculture, food, and more. Students will choose, support, and defend the feasibility and effectiveness of one chosen solution through a final presentation project.

Meet the teacher
Joseph Montuori 
Social Studies, Horace Greeley High School